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samuelbradley:

 An afternoon with Benedict Cumberbatch

 Celebrities spend a notable portion of their time with photographers. They spend this allotted time in front of a camera, choosing how much they reveal of themselves, posing, not posing, indulging requests, refusing them… Then they go away, often leaving a lasting impression on the photographer. Which begs the question, how much of an impression can a photographer leave on a celebrity? It would be easy to leave a bad one, just be an arsehole. But to leave a lasting positive impression before anyone even sees the photos, how often does that happen? 

 I am not flamboyant, loud, boisterous, camp or crass. I possess few of the imagined stereotypical celebrity photographer qualities. I am polite, patient, anxious in the beginning, more confident as the shoot goes on, witty if I get lucky and I like to talk to my subject. Not just asking them questions, like some kind of bonus interview, but talking about myself too, so it’s a normal conversation between two normal people. I don’t give enormous amounts of direction when making portraiture. I wait, I nudge, I wait some more, I suggest, I keep waiting until ‘the photograph appears’. Sometimes I take pictures to fill the time waiting for ‘the photograph’ and sometimes those pictures work, but most of the time I know when I have got the shot I’ve waited for before looking at the back of the camera, or seeing the contact sheets. In this case, with Benedict, I shot entirely on film.

 I don’t want to exaggerate, I’m sure my assistant would tell you that to him and anyone else on the shoot observing, there were no remarkable exchanges between myself and Mr Cumberbatch. At one point I told him he was being ‘too sexy’ - I think he’d undone some buttons on his shirt - and that became sort of a running joke for the rest of the shoot, but I’m probably romanticising. Even so, it sticks in my mind, begging embellishment with each retelling. 

  It’s intimidating, in truth, to talk to someone who’s very personality has catapulted them to international stardom. I didn’t achieve some small success in photography because I’m hilarious, brilliant, witty or charming, I got to where I am because of my ‘eye’ (and to an arguably larger extent, my business strategy). Whether or not I did a good job doesn’t become evident until much later on, after the shoot has finished and everyone has gone home. Benedict on the other hand, is required to exude charisma at all times, the nature of his talent means it is instantaneously evident, judged live. To photograph someone with his strength of character is to strive frantically to capture a portion of it. Even if you only manage half a second, that’s all you need, such is the immortality of a still image.

 I’ve had a lot of excellent feedback on the story for OUT magazine, most notably from Benedict’s devoted fan-base, who arguably know him best of all, being followers of everything he does, every photo, every interview, chat show appearance and the like. Still I don’t know what Benedict himself thinks of the pictures, or me as a person for that matter, and am unlikely to ever find out, at least directly.

 All I can say with absolute certainty about my time with Sherlock, Smaug, Julian, Alan, Khan, is that it never felt awkward or uncomfortable, I spent most of it smiling, a handful of it laughing, and whether I made any sort of impression on him or not, I am eternally thankful that he happened to be my first cover.

(via duckland)

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benedictcumberbatchsitsinchairs:

OH MY GOD.
OH.
MY.
GOD.
HE TOOK THIS FOR ME AND NO ONE CAN TELL ME OTHERWISE.

benedictcumberbatchsitsinchairs:

OH MY GOD.

OH.

MY.

GOD.

HE TOOK THIS FOR ME AND NO ONE CAN TELL ME OTHERWISE.

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estychan:

britishbennyc:

benedictsbigdick:

Me seducing yo man

Oh my gOD

BENEDICT, WHAT

estychan:

britishbennyc:

benedictsbigdick:

Me seducing yo man

Oh my gOD

BENEDICT, WHAT

(via reichenfeels)

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junejuly15:

+
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sherlockisthebest:

x
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hiddlesluscious:

Benedict Cumberbatch // Out Magazine - November 2014

(via lions-tigers-benedict)

Quote
"

Suddenly, a young woman was standing nearby. “Sorry to interrupt,” she said, “but can I take a picture of my sons with you?” Her two small boys stood some way off. McCartney, unhappy about the intrusion, said politely, “I’d rather not, actually, if you don’t mind. I’ll shake hands with you. But I don’t do photos.”

"I want to send to my parents-"

"I know, darling, you and everyone. But I don’t do it. That’s why. I hope you don’t mind. I hope you don’t think I’m being big-headed."

"No!" she said.

"But I think your sons are wonderful."

Eventually the woman went away, and McCartney said, “Everyone’s got a camera. Everyone’s got a phone, man. It’s not just the paparazzi - which I’ve had two of this morning. And I’ve had two requests from the public as well, to take a photo with them. And I don’t want to take a photo with every single person in the world - especially when I’m having a private moment.”

"

That passage, from John Colapinto’s 1997 profile of Paul McCartney in The New Yorker, reminded me of the fandom kerfuffle today over Benedict’s decline to take a photo with a fan while being interviewed for Out magazine. While I understand the urge to seize the opportunity to approach a celebrity whose work you enjoy, there’s a bigger part of me that wonders, “What happened?” What happened to respecting a stranger’s boundaries, even if they happen to be a well-known stranger? In both cases, the men were in the middle of a conversation with someone and the fans thought it justifiable to interrupt. In both articles, the famous men politely declined the request for a photo, but spent a moment talking with the fan instead. Yet there’s a palpable reaction today along the lines of How dare he. How dare Benedict not take a photo with a random stranger who interrupted his conversation. 

When did fandom morph into an entitlement monster? An artist creates a work that gives you hours of enjoyment, and maybe some sort of emotional fulfillment to boot. Should the reaction to seeing said artist really be, “What else does he/she owe me?” If you see said artist out in public, clearly busy, what part of you thinks, “I should really interrupt?” I think what makes people do that is the thought that it may be their only chance, which is fine. But be aware that your message is, “My chance to get a photo that will impress my friends and family is much more valuable than whatever you were doing, and you should indulge me.” You may think you’re special, but you’re not. You’re not the first person to ask for an autograph or photo. You may think, “But it would only take a minute,” but multiple people thinking that way results in a lot of minutes. And do you like it when someone else decides that their time is more valuable than yours? What happened to, “I understand and I apologize for bothering you?”

(Source: thecutteralicia, via lions-tigers-benedict)

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dudeufugly:

ohgodbenny:

Bonus

clip here (at 4:06)

(via dixiebell)

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anindoorkitty:

benedictcumberbatchsitsinchairs:

I’m going to pretend BC is saying something extraordinarily romantic in tonight’s Evening GIF and not “I’d like to tell you his name but… it’s Classified.” 
You’re destroying me, Cumberbatch.  Destroying me.

I concur

anindoorkitty:

benedictcumberbatchsitsinchairs:

I’m going to pretend BC is saying something extraordinarily romantic in tonight’s Evening GIF and not “I’d like to tell you his name but… it’s Classified.” 

You’re destroying me, Cumberbatch.  Destroying me.

I concur

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cumberbum:

Flaunt Magazine article via Momof3kids1dog

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(via cumbertrekky)